Soon, a twisted relationship develops, and Ray senses impeding trouble for the girl. All he wants is to be left alone, but circumstances thrust him into real life with every bit of evil that goes with it. As the demons of his past are reawakened, Ray must decide if vengeance is truly history or whether protecting the dead requires eliminating the living.

Ash Man follows the reclusive ways of a man totally disillusioned by life. After experiencing the harsh realities of a homeless adolescence, Ray finds both comfort and reassurance with the dead. He is the ultimate loner, seemingly incapable of socialization, yet totally protective of those he deems in need. “Ray is the kind of man you want on your side and the worst kind of adversary if he’s not. As one character notes, he is comfort and fear all in the same body. He is both hero and villain. But it is this dual nature that torments Ray throughout his life, subjecting him to the potential for evil that often overrides thoughts of good.”

No one should play with the dead, especially when Raymond Faustanetti is around. For twenty-four years, the veteran cremator has burned bodies at the old cemetery; it’s a job he takes very seriously. However, not everyone shares his dedication to the deceased. His new boss, Everett Cochran, pompous son of the wealthy, new owner, doesn’t get Ray at all and insists on aggravating his freak employee whenever possible. But the cremator won’t back down. And that dark determination often creates sparks between them that rival the flames roasting the corpses.

When an attractive girl named Alex wanders among the tombstones, both men are drawn to her. Ray refuses his primal urges to keep his haunted past buried. But nothing stops Everett who is determined to have her. With Dad’s money as bait, he seems to get his wish.

Ash Man

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You Can't appreciate the light without the dark